Books


Fiction


The Saint of Santa Fe

Edition: Paperback (193 pages)
Publisher: Anaphora Literary Press (April 7, 2014)

In 1968, a young, recently ordained Colombian priest leaves behind everything to start a new parish in the jungles of Panama. Father Héctor Gallego soon discovers that his parishioners live as indentured servants. Inspired by liberation theology, he sets into motion a plan to free them. Father Gallego is successful, but his work places him on a collision course with General Omar Torrijos, the nation’s absolute ruler. On June 9, 1971, military operatives abduct the priest. He is never seen or heard from again, but he remains very much alive in the minds of Panamanians who, still today, clamor for his case to be brought to justice. Although The Saint of Santa Fe is a work of fiction, the novel is based on the real-life experiences of Héctor Gallego and the campesinos who worked alongside him to create a just society... More?





Meet Me Under the Ceiba

Edition: Paperback (256 pages)
Publisher: Arte Publico Press (September 30, 2009)

An American professor of Nicaraguan descent spending the summer in his parents' homeland learns of Adela's murder and vows to unravel the threads of the mystery. He begins the painstaking process of interviewing the townspeople, and it quickly becomes apparent that Adela, a hard-working campesina who never learned to read and write, and Don Roque had one thing in common: the beautiful Ixelia Cruz. The love of Adela's life, Ixelia was one of Don Roque's many possessions until Adela lured her away. The interviews with Adela's family, neighbors, and former lovers shed light on the circumstances of her death and reveal the lively community left reeling by her brutal murder... More?





Bernardo and the Virgin

Edition: Hardcover (320 pages)
Publisher: Northwestern University Press (May 10, 2005)

In 1980, with the Sandinistas newly in power, tailor and pig farmer Bernardo Martinez witnesses an extraordinary thing: an otherworldly glow about the statue of the Virgin Mary in the church where he works as sacristán. Soon the Holy Virgin appears. She tells Bernardo to forget his money problems and fear of ridicule and spread her message of peace and faith to his neighbors. Though a work of fiction, Bernardo and the Virgin is based on actual events in Bernardo Martinez's life. The visitation of the Virgin Mary at Cuapa, Nicaragua, remains one of the few such events accepted by the Roman Catholic Church in the last sixty years... More?





Essays


Love Made Visible: Reflections on Writing, Teaching, and Other Distractions

Edition: Paperback (176 pages).
Publisher: CreateSpace (June 27, 2011)




Before Fiction


Julia Alvarez: A Critical Companion
(Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers)


Edition: Hardcover (184 pages)
Publisher: Greenwood Press (August 30, 2001)

Julia Alvarez made her mark on the American literary horizon with the 1991 publication of her debut novel How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, a story based on her own family's bicultural experiences. This Critical Companion introduces readers to the life and works of Dominican American writer Alvarez and examines the thematic and cultural concerns that run through her novels... More?



Conversations With Rudolfo Anaya (Literary Conversations Series)

Edition: Paperback (256 pages)
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi (November 1, 1998)
More?



Tropical Town and Other Poems (Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage)

Edition: Hardcover (184 pages)
Publisher: Greenwood Press (August 30, 2001)

Poetry. "The Nicaraguan-born poet Salomon de la Selva poses a unique and fascinating case in the recovery of U.S. Hispanic literature. The challenge of studying de la Selva's first published collection of poetry, TROPICAL TOWN AND OTHER POEMS, arises as soon as we attempt to trace its literary lineage... TROPICAL TOWN represents the first English-language collection of poetry by a Hispanic writer in the United Sates -- a fact unknown to most scholars and students of Hispanic-American literature... More?



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